Thursday November 30

Agenda Day 1

Dr Peter Hotez
Dr James Crowe
09:20

Human Vaccine Project: How much of the immune response do we understand? Deciphering the human immunome for a better vaccine design

  • How have technological advances in next-generation DNA sequencing offered ways to probe the human immune system?
  • Results so far on the Human Immunome that could lead to acceleration of vaccine development
  • Working toward a complete catalogue of expressed human immune receptors
  • Challenges in interpreting the vast amount of data into meaningful information
Dr Darrick Carter
09:45

What can we learn from vaccine development for infectious diseases that can be applied to cancer and vice versa?

  • Bridging infectious disease vaccines with cancer immunotherapy
  • Technologies that are applicable to both including RNA vaccines
  • How to stimulate both humoral and cell-mediated immunity that are likely paramount for successful cancer immunotherapeutics
  • Understanding infectious vaccine approaches and immunological responses to strengthen cancer immunotherapeutic strategies
10:25

NEW: Speed networking – Break the ice with your peers!

Allowing conference delegates to meet each other for a short space of time and exchange business cards. A unique feature guaranteeing heightened networking for all participants
10:40

Morning Networking Break

Immune Characterisation Techniques

New immunotherapy trends

Investment Perspectives

Infectious Diseases
11:45

The Human Vaccine Project’s first clinical trial: Understanding the rules of lifelong immunological protection

  • The importance of looking at all aspects of immune response and integrating this data to get an accurate reflection of response to vaccination
  • What distinguishes the 30% of people who have a good response after a single dose of Hep B vaccine
  • Results from initial study assessing immune responses of 10 healthy adults (ages 40-80) to a licensed hepatitis B vaccine, expansion into larger numbers and demographics
  • Outlook for 2018 and beyond:  projects looking at HPV vaccination – challenges to overcome
Immunotherapy
11:45

Personalized cancer vaccines that target patients-specific mutations: Platforms amenable for neoantigen vaccination

  • Strategies for target antigen identification and validation 
  • Personalized vaccines-specific considerations in adjuvant selection
  • Challenges in clinical studies, i.e., patient selection, dose selection, efficacy determination and regulatory paths
Infectious Diseases
12:15

Lymph node fine needle aspirates to reveal correlates for immunization-induced neutralizing antibodies

  • The central role of the germinal center response in generating neutralizing antibodies after HIV Env trimer immunization.
  • The importance of immunization route.
  • Lymph node fine needle aspirates can be used to analyze germinal centers in humans after immunization.
Immunotherapy
12:15

The identification of tumor-host interactions that propagate an anti-tumor immune response

  • A deeper understanding of tumor-host interaction is essential for the development of effective immunotherapies
  • Designing successful clinical trials to identify responders and non-responders
  • Using the insight gained from clinical trials to identify which patients will benefit from which drug combinations
Funding and Partnerships
12:30

Investment Banking Panel: Status of the US vaccine & immunotherapy market

  • Health of the US vaccine and immunotherapy market
  • What’s needed to offer private financing or public offerings
  • What do investors currently have an appetite for?
Infectious Diseases
12:45

Early innate immune responses to Hep B vaccination using single cell RNA sequencing approaches

  • Using single cell transcriptomic analysis to more accurately define and evaluate vaccine responses, with Hep B as an example
  • What’s happening immediately after vaccination in the primary response?
  • Unique data challenges in integrating meaningful analysis into better vaccine design
  • Application of machine learning methods – can we predict how our immune system responds?
Immunotherapy
12:45

Insights into combination studies across various tumour types

  • The rational for pursuing combination therapy, the number of combinations currently being pursued
  • Examples of current combinations with TECENTRIQ and other partner molecules
  • Challenges associated with developing combination clinical trial studies – should we change how these trials are designed?
1:15

Networking Lunch & Poster Session

Respiratory & Emerging Diseases

Infectious Diseases
2:45

Clinical results of a novel oral Norovirus vaccine

  • Intestinal immunity may be necessary for protection against norovirus infection
  •  Oral immunization induces a robust mucosal memory and effector antibody response
Immunotherapy
2:45

Advanced immune characterization using RNA enables biomarker discovery in limiting and diverse samples

  • Highlight approaches to characterize the tumor microenvironment and current hurdles
  • Introduction of new technology which reveals immune cell composition present in the tumor, elucidates activated immune-escape pathways, and measures mutational burden to characterize tumor foreignness, all from a single RNA sample
  • Validation data and case study overview
Funding and Partnerships
2:45

Corporate Venture Panel: Unique investment strategies and investing in platform technologies

  • What are corporate venture firms looking for? What is the best point of entry?
  • What is the nature of the terms and conditions; the unique structure of each CVC firm
  • How closely do we work with our parent companies?
  • Investing in early-stage companies and investment timelines
  • Differences in balance between strategic focus and financial focus.
Infectious Diseases
3:00

Nasal vaccination for respiratory infections

  • Introduction to technology platform; mobilizing the immune system in ways conventional vaccines cannot
  • Key advantages of nasal vaccination
  • NasoVAX seasonal influenza clinical program updates
Infectious Diseases
3:15

Progress toward developing a preventive MERS-CoV vaccine

  • Since it was first isolated in 2012, Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) has caused severe acute lower respiratory disease in more than 2000 people across 27 countries and killed 35% of those it has infected.
  • The high case fatality ratio, broad geographic distribution and absence of a licensed therapy or vaccine has created an imperative for an effective public health countermeasure to MERS
  • Preliminary findings from our first-in-human phase 1 trial of a MERS CoV consensus MERS Spike DNA vaccine are presented and placed in the context of the larger efforts to develop a preventive vaccine for MERS CoV.
Immunotherapy
3:15

Next generation biomarkers for the era of precision cancer immunotherapy

  • “Empiric” and “science-driven” approaches to clinical experimentation are synergistic, and enable iterative learning
  • Novel biomarker tools are needed to enable more accurate interpretation of clinical results from combination I-O clinical trials.
  • Precision immuno-oncology: Biomarkers that describe fundamental parameters of tumor immunobiology are needed to triage patients to the appropriate combination therapies.
  • Implications:
    • Clinical trial design (enrichment, umbrella, basket)
    • Diagnostics: Acceleration of novel biomarkers
    • Regulatory:  Accelerated approval for biomarker-defined populations; complementary diagnostics; tumor-agnostic labeling
Funding and Partnerships
3:30

A Regulatory Perspective --- Clinical Considerations for Novel Immunotherapies

  • Brief overview of approval processes
  • Review of cell therapies including; adoptive T-cell’s, CAR- T cells, TCRs
  • A closer look at cancer vaccines and neoantigens
Infectious Diseases
3:45

ELISpot and FluoroSpot in vaccine research, development, and evaluation

  • Measure T-cell and B-cell responses at the single cell level
  • Virus cross-reactivity in Influenza
  • Ferret IFN-gamma ELISpot
Immunotherapy
3:45

Increasing the potency of DNA-based immunotherapies using PolyStart peptide expression system

  • PolyStart is a unique plasmid DNA construct that expresses four or more peptides for each molecule of mRNA, rather than the dogmatic one DNA = one RNA = one protein
  • How PolyStart can increase the efficiency with which target cells can be identified and elminated
  • Applications in immuno-oncology and potential for use in infectious disease
Infectious Diseases
4:00

Optimized presentation of antigens using enveloped Virus Like Particles

  • Use of enveloped virus-like particles (eVLPs) for inducing neutralizing antibodies against CMV
  • eVLP expression of multiple antigens for use in immunotherapy
  • Mechanisms responsible for eVLP-based vaccine potency
Immunotherapy
4:00

Progress of immune checkpoint antibodies and cancer vaccines as immunotherapies

Funding and Partnerships
4:00

Innovative finance mechanisms for funding vaccine procurement

  • What financial mechanisms does GAVI use to ensure they can sustain investment in vaccines 
  • Tools used to incentivize certain types of vaccine development
    • E.g. Advanced market commitment to pneumococcal vaccines
  • The vaccine investment strategy process
    • Used to inform GAVI which vaccines they will invest in from 2020
    • GAVI’s view on the landscape of vaccine development
4:15

Networking Break

Infectious Diseases
4:45

Is it time to start considering antibodies as an alternative to vaccines?

  • Synagis® (palivizumab) is the only monoclonal antibody (MAb) currently marketed for prevention of an infectious disease
  • Advances in biologics technology has allowed the development of a highly potent MAb that is being investigated as a vaccine surrogate to protect all infants from RSV disease
  • Are there other diseases, for which vaccine development has been difficult, where MAbs might fill the void?
Immunotherapy
4:45

Mechanisms of action of Talimogene Laherparepvec: From Bench to Bedside

  • Preclinical data and mechanism of action
  • Updates on clinical data in combination with checkpoint inhibitors
Dr Jason DeVoss, Senior Scientist,, Amgen
Funding and Partnerships
4:45

The application of machine learning methods to accelerate the development of vaccines and immunotherapies

  • Brief introduction to key machine learning techniques
  • Examples of where these techniques have already been applied in the development of vaccines.
  • The application of machine learning methods to the initial results of the HVP’s first clinical trial
  • Future outlook and scope of how this technology can help advance the field of vaccines and immunotherapy
Immunotherapy
5:00

Delivering multiple immunotherapies in a single construct; what makes WO-12 unique amongst oncolytic virotherapies?

  • WO-12 is an immuno-oncolytic virus engineered to replicate in cancer cells while delivering therapeutic transgenes that train the immune system to target the tumor
  • How does WO-12's interaction with TLR signalling pathways result in increased beneficial T-Cell responses while reducing the antibody response?
  • The importance of modifying the tumour micro-environment in eliciting good immunotherapeutic responses
  • Challenges to overcome in achieving systemic delivery
  • Outlook for beginning of human clinical trials in 2018
Infectious Diseases
5:15

Using 3D Cryo-electron microscopy technology to determine the structures of vaccine nanoparticles to enable better vaccine design

  • Using state of the art structural biology techniques to design nanoparticles that display conserved epitopes; influenza case study
  • The importance of conformational state in B-cell activation
  • Potential for use in other infectious diseases and immunotherapy
  • The future of immunogen design to elicit the required antibodies and the characterisation of therapeutic antibodies to boost immune response
Immunotherapy
5:15

The generation and modulation of immunogenic cell death using oncolytic viruses

  • What is immunogenic cell death? Mechanism and modulation by oncolytic viruses
  • Signalling pathways that regulate the tumor immunosuppressive milieu and their alteration
  • Cancer stem cells immunology and inhibition of tumor immune escape
  • Modulation of immunogenic cell death by combining oncolytic viruses with other therapies
Funding and Partnerships
5:15

Blue Marble Health: An Innovative Plan to Fight Diseases of the Poor Amid Wealth

  • Today most of the poverty-related neglected diseases are found in G20 nations
  • The poor living among the wealthy account for this disease burden
  • This provides a key policy framework for new innovations to address the world's poverty-related neglected diseases
  • Examples in the context of Zika, and other emerging infections
5:45

Chair closing remarks of day one followed by drinks reception and Meet & Greet with key speakers

last published: 16/Nov/17 15:15 GMT