Thomas Kaier | British Heart Foundation Research Fellow, Specialist Registrar in Cardiology
King's College London

Thomas Kaier, British Heart Foundation Research Fellow, Specialist Registrar in Cardiology, King's College London

Dr Thomas Kaier MD MRCP MBA, British Heart Foundation Research Fellow, Specialist Registrar in Cardiology, King’s College London
Dr Kaie has graduated from the Medical University Innsbruck, Austria, in 2008 following the completion of an MD thesis investigating ischaemia/reperfusion injury in cardiomyocytes. He completed his Foundation Training in Leeds and pursued General Medical and Cardiology training in London. During his clinical training, he completed a Master of Business Administration with Merit. Following award of a competitive research fellowship by the British Heart Foundation in January 2015, he has taken up a post-graduate degree at King’s College London, investigating novel biomarkers of cardiac ischaemia. This is on track to be completed with the award of a PhD in October 2018. Dr Kaier is a Member of the Royal College of Physicians and has published in international peer-reviewed journals. His MBA thesis has received a Distinction and he won an educational grant by the European Society of Cardiology in 2017 and the ‘HyTest Cardiac Marker Award for remarkable scientific work in the field of cardiovascular diseases’, awarded by the European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EFLM).

Appearances:



Precision 2018 Day 1 @ 12:20

cMyC - how a novel biomarker could transform chest pain triage

  • Cardiac Myosin-binding Protein C (cMyC) is a novel biomarker of myocardial injury.  Over the past 20 years, cardiac Troponin has transformed emergency care around the world
  • Our research demonstrates that cMyC is more abundant than the Troponins and at least as good as the leading Troponin assays in directing immediate triage of patients presenting with suspected acute non-ST elevation myocardial infarction.
  • This property, combined with the analytic sensitivity of our assay, suggests we can detect myocardial injury on a point-of-care platform; thus, improving cardiovascular care for millions of people

back to speakers