Greg Thurber | Associate Professor in Chemical Engineering and Biomedical Engineering
University of Michigan

Greg Thurber, Associate Professor in Chemical Engineering and Biomedical Engineering, University of Michigan

Greg M. Thurber is an Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering and Biomedical Engineering at the University of Michigan. His work focuses on applying fundamental biotransport principles to design novel therapeutics and molecular imaging agents. These widely applicable techniques have found use in the Thurber laboratory in diverse projects ranging from self-administration of near-infrared molecular imaging agents for early disease detection to the modular design of stabilized alpha helices using bioorthogonal chemistry. Some of the concepts for monoclonal antibodies have found recent applications in designing improved antibody-drug conjugates for cancer therapy. Prof. Thurber received his training in protein therapeutics at MIT under the guidance of Dr. Dane Wittrup. He completed his in vivo training in molecular imaging in the laboratory of Dr. Ralph Weissleder at Mass General Hospital and Harvard Medical School. Since joining the faculty at Michigan, he has delivered 20 invited talks at major pharmaceutical companies, national and international conferences, and university departmental seminars. Prof. Thurber works with several pharmaceutical companies as a consultant, collaborator, and/or member of their scientific advisory board. He and his students have presented their interdisciplinary work at chemistry, chemical engineering, and pharmaceutical science conferences. Prof. Thurber has authored over 30 peer-reviewed journal publications, 3 book chapters, and numerous conference proceedings. He has received several awards including an NIH K01 award and the National Science Foundation CAREER award.

Appearances:



Festival of Biologics Day 1 @ 16:30

Avoiding ADC Misdirection: Designing clinically effective agents from in vitro, in vivo, and in silico data

last published: 01/Jul/22 16:05 GMT

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