Prof Bali Pulendran | Department of Pathology, Microbiology&Immunology
Stanford University School of Medicine

Prof Bali Pulendran, Department of Pathology, Microbiology&Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine

Professor Bali Pulendran is the Violetta L. Horton Professor at the Stanford University School of Medicine, and a member of the Institute for Immunology, Transplantation and Infection, and the Departments of Pathology and Microbiology & Immunology at Stanford University. He is also an adjunct professor at the Yerkes National Primate Center at Emory University, and director of the NIH U19 Center for Systems Vaccinology, at Emory University in Atlanta. He received his undergraduate degree from Cambridge University, and his Ph.D from the Walter & Eliza Hall Institute in Melbourne, Australia, under the supervision of Sir Gustav Nossal. He then did his post-doctoral work at Immunex Corporation in Seattle. Dr. Pulendran is a world leader on understanding the mechanisms by which the innate immune system regulates adaptive immunity and harnessing such mechanisms in the design of novel vaccines. More recently, his laboratory pioneered the use of systems biological approaches to predicting the efficacy of vaccines, and deciphering new correlates of protection against infectious diseases. Dr. Pulendran’s research is published in front line journals such as Nature, Science, Cell, Nature Medicine, and Nature Immunology. Furthermore, Dr. Pulendran is the recipient of numerous grants from the National Institutes of Health, and from The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, serves on many editorial boards, and is the recipient of two concurrent MERIT awards from the National Institutes of Health, as well as the 2011 Albert. E. Levy Award, 2011 Paper of the year award by the International Society for Vaccines.

Appearances:



Agenda Day 2 @ 09:30

How to effectively manipulate the microbiome to improve efficacy of vaccines and immunotherapy

  • Understanding the microbiome and its interaction with the immune system
  • What evidence is there that one can change the other?
  • Potential opportunities and current challenges in harnessing this knowledge into better treatments

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