Dr Jay A. Berzofsky | Branch Chief, Vaccine Branch
National Cancer Institute - NIH | United States

Dr Jay A. Berzofsky, Branch Chief, Vaccine Branch, National Cancer Institute - NIH

Dr. Jay Berzofsky was appointed Chief of the new Vaccine Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, in 2003, after being Chief of the Molecular Immunogenetics and Vaccine Research Section, Metabolism Branch, National Cancer Institute, NIH, since 1987.  He graduated Summa cum Laude from Harvard (1967), and received a Ph.D. and M.D. from Albert Einstein College of Medicine.  After interning at Massachusetts General Hospital, he joined NIH in 1974.  Dr. Berzofsky's research has focused on antigen processing and presentation by MHC molecules, the structure of antigenic determinants, cytokine and regulatory cell control of T cell function and avidity, and translation to the design of vaccines for AIDS, malaria, cancer, and viruses causing cancer.  He has 502 scientific publications. Dr. Berzofsky has received a number of awards, including the U.S. Public Health Service Superior Service Award, the 31st Michael Heidelberger Award, the McLaughlin Visiting Professorship, the Australasian Society for Immunology Visiting Lectureship, the Tadeusz J. Wiktor Memorial Lectureship, and the Herschel Zackheim Lectureship Award. He was elected as President of the American Society for Clinical Investigation (1993-94), a member of the Association of American Physicians, and a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and was elected Distinguished Alumnus of the Year for 2007 by the Albert Einstein College of Medicine. He was also elected Chair of the Medical Sciences Section of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) for 2007-2008. In 2008, he received the NIH Director’s Award and the NCI Merit Award, and in 2011 he received another NCI Director’s Merit Award.

Appearances:



DC Co-conference Day 2 April 4 @ 09:10

What’s next after PD1? Next generation checkpoint inhibitors including anti-TGF-beta

  • A deeper look at TGF-beta as a checkpoint inhibitor.
  • What are its effects on tumour growth and other cell types?
  • Synergy with vaccines and PD1 checkpoint inhibitors.
  • Brief look at other novel checkpoints, regulatory cells and cytokines; LAG3, Tim3

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