Franck Berthe | Senior Livestock Specialist
The World Bank | United States

Franck Berthe, Senior Livestock Specialist, The World Bank

Franck Berthe is a Senior Livestock Specialist at the World Bank Agriculture Global Practice. A One Health practitioner, Franck works across the agriculture, environment and public health sectors on health issues at the human animal environment interfaces, including animal health and welfare, food security, nutrition, food safety, zoonoses, antimicrobial resistance and pandemics preparedness. He is also the coordinator of the Livestock Global Alliance – bringing together FAO, IFAD, ILRI, OIE and WB, to connect knowledge and operations for safer, fairer and more sustainable livestock.
Franck Berthe has contributed to the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) since 1996, through specialized Commissions and ad hoc groups. He is currently Vice-President of the OIE Biological Standards Commission.
Before joining the Bank, Franck Berthe was Head of the Animal and Plant Health Unit at the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA), assessing animal and plant production systems and practices with respect to primary production, ecosystems and public health. His job was to provide scientific advice to the EU risk managers and decision makers on a wide range of risks along the food chain. Prior to coming to Italy in 2007, he was Associate Professor at the Atlantic Veterinary College (UPEI) and Canada Research Chair in Aquatic Health Sciences, exploring host pathogens relations in their environment. From 1994 to 2004, Franck has led active research in aquatic animal health at the French institute for the exploitation of the sea (IFREMER) in France and overseas territories.
A native of France, Franck received a doctorate of veterinary medicine (DVM), and a PhD degree in molecular taxonomy and epidemiology. He holds a Pasteur Institute diploma in bacteriology.

Appearances:



DC Co-conference Day 3 April 5 @ 11:30

Panel:Alternatives to Antibiotics: Issues and opportunities from funders’ perspective

  • How to incentivise vet pharma companies to produce new veterinary products to reduce AMR resistance
  • Marketing the science and the costs associated with this
  • Statement of societal goals that the funding entity would like to accomplish
  • Political feasibility of incentive mechanisms (e.g., is a program that gives money to large pharma companies likely to be accepted by legislators?)
  • Economics of incentive mechanisms (e.g., which incentive ‘lever’ can be pushed for maximal effect?  What would unintended consequences of such incentives be?)

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