Day 3 Co conferences and Plenary April 12

Partnerships April 12
09:00

Chair’s opening remarks

Dr Jim Tartaglia, Vice President New Vaccine Project Head North America, Sanofi Pasteur
Cancer & Immunotherapy
09:10

How to overcome tumour immunosuppression – Understanding immunosuppression in the microenvironment that leads to anti-tumour activity

  • Understanding the mechanism that is preventing T-cells from killing cancer cells
  • The important role tumor-induced T reg cells play and development of strategies to overcome this effect
  • Employing anti-CD4 antibody to partially deplete CD4 T-cells
  • Using this method in PhI clinical trials to uncover therapeutic efficacy in a multiple vaccination model
Influenza and Respiratory
09:10

Scientific challenges and results on developing a new pertussis vaccine

  • The need for a new pertussis vaccine with longer lasting immunity
  • Challenges in making an effective pertussis vaccines: Cyclical by nature, waning immunity, asymptomatic carriers
Emerging Diseases
09:10

Shigella vaccine built on GMMA technology – Using outer membrane particles shed from genetically engineered bacteria for cost effective vaccines

  • The potential impact and cost-effectiveness of a Shigella vaccine in developing countries
  • Potential of the GMMA technology in vaccine strategies targeting poverty related diseases
Veterinary
09:10

Developing vaccines to eradicate the FMD disease virus

 
  • Vaccination as an intervention strategy to support the global control and eradication of foot-and-mouth
  • Development of new process technology and improvement on product claims; new generation vaccines to overcome challenges in vaccine development associated with viral diversity, short immunity durations and temperature instability
  • Developments, opportunities and current challenges
Partnerships April 12
09:10

Developing new standards for building trust with pharmaceutical companies: A reflection on GlaxoSmithKline’s (GSK’s) journey

  • Changing the standard ways of working that industry uses with its academic and public health customers
  • How to become a trusted partner in the scientific and public health community to deliver the best quality of healthcare to patients
  • Changing the standard ways of working that industry uses with its academic and public health customers
  • How to become a trusted partner in the scientific and public health community to deliver the best quality of healthcare to patients
 
Influenza and Respiratory
09:40

Disease modifying vaccines in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

-          Presenting early stage development of a vaccine to prevent the bacterial infections that exacerbate COPD
-          COPD is a very common, chronic, progressive, respiratory illness of adults, which can be triggered by bacterial infections
-          A vaccine to prevent these respiratory infections could modify the clinical progression of COPD, and improve quality of life
Emerging Diseases
09:40

Interactive discussion: Using the recent license of Cholera vaccine as a case study

  • Single-dose live oral cholera vaccine shown to protect cholera in protection in a human cholera challenge model
  • Lessons learned from the regulatory approval that may be applicable to other vaccines
  • Next steps to have this available for children and for use outside of the US
Veterinary
09:40

Broad-cross protection vaccines: Developing novel universal Influenza vaccines to meet a significant global health need

  • Enhancing the standard of care through broadly protective avian influenza vaccination
  • Development challenges faced
  • Lessons learnt that can be applied to future universal vaccine development
Senior representative, Calixar
Bioprocessing & Manufacture
09:40

Bioconjugation technology for the next generation of conjugate vaccines: Recent improvements, CQAs, and analytics method development

  • Technology advantages and opportunities
  • Focus on development and characterization of bioconjugate vaccine candidates
  • Discussion of CQAs based on preclinical and clinical POC data
Bioprocessing & Manufacture
09:40

Bioconjugation technology for the next generation of conjugate vaccines: Recent improvements, CQAs, and analytics method development

 
  • Technology advantages and opportunities
  • Focus on development and characterization of bioconjugate vaccine candidates
  • Discussion of CQAs based on preclinical and clinical POC data
Partnerships April 12
09:40

Structural-guided immunogen design

Dr Audray Harris, Chief of Structural Informatics Unit Laboratory of Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health
Cancer & Immunotherapy
10:10

Can understanding antiviral immunity induced by oncolytic viruses predict their success as a tumor immunotherapy?

  • Oncolytic viruses as immunotherapy: progress and remaining challenges
  • How do we restrain antiviral immune responses and minimize pathology while promoting antitumor immunity to override immune tolerance?
  • Combining OV therapy with chemo- and immune-based therapeutic regimens and the risks
Influenza and Respiratory
10:10

How much cross protection between serotypes is enough for a pneumococcal vaccine?

  • Are the current serotypes in the vaccine enough protection?
  • How can we measure and predict this?
  • Comparing cross protection with other vaccine candidates
Bioprocessing & Manufacture
10:10

Process Development, Scale-up and COG of conjugate vaccines

 
  • Presentation on Scale-up commercial manufacturing and challenges
  • Impact on COGS
  • Incl. Classical and modern  conjugation reactions
Partnerships April 12
10:10

New technology showcase 3

Emerging Diseases
10:25

Tools to assess and advance Group A Streptococcus Vaccines

 
  • Assembly and genome sequencing of a representative strain panel 
  • Economic analysis of vaccine implementation in Australia and New Zealand, compared to other public health initiatives
  • Development of a reference assay
  • A clinical development plan to move forward with
Partnerships April 12
10:25

New technology showcase 4

10:40

Networking coffee break

Cancer & Immunotherapy
11:30

Self-antigen T-cell vaccines for the treatment and prevention of breast and ovarian cancers

 
  • Integrating different cancer vaccine types and check point inhibitors in combinational approaches
  • Augmenting CD4 helper T-cell immunity using peptide epitopes
Influenza and Respiratory
11:30

NasoShieldTM anthrax vaccine candidate provides protection from challenge and rapid immunogenicity following a single intranasal dose

 
  • Serotype coverage and conjugate vaccines
  • Carriage, efficacy and effectiveness data
  • With no immune correlate of protection for pneumococcal proteins, what basis do you move into the clinic?
  • What would constitute an adequate proof of concept study?
Emerging Diseases
11:30

Paratyphoid A fever & vaccine development: The importance of vaccines with the rise of antibiotic resistance

 
  • Role of vaccines as a part of an integrated program to combat the spread of antibiotic resistance 
  • The need for a more effective Typhoid vaccine and an adequate supply needed to meet demand, particularly in the most affected countries
  • Overview of the promising candidates in the pipeline
Dr Allan Saul, Institute Director, GSK Vaccines Institute for Global Health, S.r.l.
Cancer & Immunotherapy
12:00

Comprehensive profiling of T cell responses to putative neoantigens reveals smarter targets for cancer immunotherapy

  • ATLAS™ is a clinically-proven platform that can comprehensively characterize the specificity and quality of HLA-diverse human T cell responses
  • T cell neoantigens identified using ATLAS are often missed by algorithms
  • Inhibitory neoantigens are emerging that could not be predicted in silico
  • ATLAS T cell profiles predict response to checkpoint blockade therapy
Influenza and Respiratory
12:00

Tuberculosis vaccine R&D: Addressing a global epidemic

 
  • New insights into why immunity from BCG vaccine is so variable
  • Paving the way we develop new TB vaccines
  • Identify immune correlates that could facilitate TB vaccine development
Emerging Diseases
12:00

Developing a promising new bacterial vaccine against enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC)

 
  • Status of vaccine research and development
  • ETVAX is the most advanced ETEC candidate; a subunit approach is also in clinical development – will this be the next vaccine
  • Ongoing research evaluating the impact of adjuvants and new “omics” technologies
Veterinary
12:00

Eradicating Porcine Cysticercosis with a novel vaccine containing the TSol 18 protein

 
  • Global clinical trials demonstrating the efficacy of the vaccine in protecting pigs against T.solium
  • Recombinant vaccine containing TSol 18 protein licensed for commercial use for first time in the world
  • Exciting eradication potential and lessons learnt from development challenges faced
12:30

Networking Lunch & Poster Session

Dr Gregory A. Poland
Partnerships April 12
13:30

UBER Vaccinology:  A new operational and funding paradigm for vaccine innovation

  • Publically funded, not-for-profit model to de-risk vaccine development to meet public health needs and industry thresholds
  • Effective leveraging of funding through networks and partnerships
  • Fostering partnerships to drive vaccine innovation
  • Attaining self-sustainability in a not-for-profit organization
 
Dr Alan R. Hinman
13:40

The eradication of Polio: Have we succeeded?


-    Measuring and monitoring the success of eradication
-    End game and strategic plan
-    What’s next? Can we eradicate measles?
 
Professor Robert Daum
14:10

A call for greater consideration for the role of vaccines in national strategies to combat antibiotic-resistant bacteria


-    Recommendations from the National Vaccine Advisory Committee
-    Use of vaccines to prevent the infections that could or have developed AMR to antibiotics, in adjunction to antibiotic stewardship
-    Examples in Haemophilus influenza, Streptococcus, Staphylococcus aureus

 
Partnerships April 12
14:30

Support mechanisms to develop vaccines with better efficacy: Why does the efficacy of the rota virus vaccine drop in low to middle income countries?

 
  • What vaccines are the NIH prioritizing and why?
  • How could we increase the efficacy of existing vaccines and why does it drop in low to middle income countries?
  • How to access government funding for vaccine development programs
Dr Danilo Casimiro
14:40

Panel: How much efficacy is enough? What are the implications of a vaccine no longer being a replacement technology but a companion technology?


-    The concept of partially protected vaccines like malaria, TB, NTDs where the clinical efficacy is no longer 85/90% but closer to 40% 
-    Future of vaccine development 
-    The combining drivers of technology and emerging diseases

More panelists to be announced shortly
Partnerships April 12
15:00

Addressing the fragmented landscape of funding opportunities for companies and academic developers of vaccines

  • How can different funders and vaccine developers work together to improve the environment of vaccine development
  • Setting global priorities for vaccine development
15:30

Chair’s closing remarks and close of congress

last published: 12/Jan/17 13:36 GMT