Som Seif | President & CEO
Purpose Investments

Som Seif, President & CEO, Purpose Investments

Som Seif is the founder and Chief Executive Officer of Purpose Investments Inc. which he formed following the sale of Claymore to BlackRock Inc. in March 2012. Mr. Seif started Claymore in Canada in January 2005 and was the former President and Chief Executive Officer leading the implementation of the company's business development and corporate strategies. Over the seven years of its operation, Claymore organically grew to $8 billion in assets and established itself as a Canadian leader in bringing intelligent, low cost exchange-traded funds to investors through its family of thirty-four exchange-traded funds across broad asset classes.

Prior to Claymore, Mr. Seif was an investment banker with RBC Capital Markets, where he worked since 1999. He played a key role in developing the structured products group at RBC Capital Markets in both Canada and the U.S., where he structured and raised capital for both Canadian and U.S. asset managers.

Som is a Chartered Financial Analyst and has a Bachelor of Applied Science with an emphasis on Industrial and Systems Engineering from the University of Toronto. Som has a strong commitment to community and is currently Vice Chair of the Sunnybrook Hospital Foundation Board, Chair of the Art Gallery of Ontario Corporate Development Committee, a member of the Art Gallery of Ontario’s Foundation Board and University of Toronto Mechanical & Industrial Engineering Advisory Board, and a board member of Next 36. In 2011, Som was recognized for his vision and leadership by Caldwell Partners International with the Top 40 Under 40 award.

Appearances:



Day 1 @ 13:40

Passive aggressive – what’s next for active management as investors continue flocking to ETFs & index funds?

  • Cost factor – should the timeless passive vs. active debate be recast as high vs. low-cost investing?
  • Compensation structure – is the 2 & 20 fee structure officially extinct?  What other viable compensation structures could replace it? 
  • Regulation & consolidation – should we expect margin compression and increasing regulatory burdens to bring more consolidation to the asset management industry?
  • Passive investing bubble? Are falling correlations between assets an early indicator of an imminent passive investing bubble bursting? Will such a bubble ultimately create a fertile environment for an active management comeback? 
  • Dead, dying or evolving? Have robo-advisors, smart beta funds and other FinTech/InvestTech innovations already sounded the death knell for traditional forms of active management? If so, how will active management be defined in the future? Will the systematic methods employed by quants evolve to replace the elements of human intuition? 

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